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quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Scheppach 6 1/4-inch Blade Plunge Saw

Speed to First Woot:
10m 51.663s
First Sucker:
LucerinRed
Last Wooter to Woot:
rjkaces
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 5% of Tools Woots
Top 37% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 5% of Tools Woots
Top 15% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 13% first woot
  • 7% second woot
  • 24% < 10 woots
  • 23% < 25 woots
  • 34% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 10% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 13% one year old
  • 75% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 96% bought 1
  • 3% bought 2
  • 1% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

4%
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2%
1%
2%
4%
7%
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10%
9%
10%
6%
5%
4%
4%
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1%
0%
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12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

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Quality Posts


Face76


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Face76

hellboy999


quality posts: 5 Private Messages hellboy999

I just bought a grizzly track saw seen here http://www.grizzly.com/products/Track-Saw/T10687. Looks like a knock off of this saw. For longer tracks, the grizzly tracks will probably work.

kuma99


quality posts: 9 Private Messages kuma99

I just use a Skill worm drive saw and keep a real steady hand. Sometimes I won't even draw a line.

doccelo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages doccelo

Looks like a rebranded saw. Grizzly, Woodstar Divar 55, and this Scheppach all look the same. Look on youtube and you'll see the same advertisement for both the Woodstar and the Scheppach. Also, the blade is 6 1/4", not 6 1/2" like most other track saws. May have a hard time finding replacement blades, or being limited in blade choice. Something to consider...

peakandpine


quality posts: 1 Private Messages peakandpine

Ah, what t'hell is a plunge saw?

whitcwa


quality posts: 12 Private Messages whitcwa

It has a universal motor, so it can run on AC/DC. It weighs only 10.6 pounds. There's probably a lot of aluminum which is not heavy metal.

colovos


quality posts: 1 Private Messages colovos
doccelo wrote:Looks like a rebranded saw. Grizzly, Woodstar Divar 55, and this Scheppach all look the same. Look on youtube and you'll see the same advertisement for both the Woodstar and the Scheppach. Also, the blade is 6 1/4", not 6 1/2" like most other track saws. May have a hard time finding replacement blades, or being limited in blade choice. Something to consider...



Scheppach Plunge saw uses the same size blade as Festool plunge saw. Festool provides a large variety of blades for their plunge saw which will fit the Scheppach Plunge saw.

Jackson20


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Jackson20

Is this like a skill saw with training wheels?

R&D


quality posts: 2 Private Messages R&D

Normally... one would have to frequent a Harbor Freight store to achieve this level of quality. Don't plan on this tool becoming a family heirloom...

jjkenobi


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jjkenobi

I could see a lot of instances this saw would be very handy - I do all sorts of wood building projects. Unfortunately I don't have $120 lying around to blow on it.

luke975


quality posts: 13 Private Messages luke975
colovos wrote:Scheppach Plunge saw uses the same size blade as Festool plunge saw. Festool provides a large variety of blades for their plunge saw which will fit the Scheppach Plunge saw.




if you're a rep please introduce yourself

I always did like yardsales.

ctviggen


quality posts: 6 Private Messages ctviggen

What these are really good for is cutting large pieces of plywood or MDF. Unfortunately, this has a fairly small track. Nonetheless, I've tried cutting even two foot pieces of plywood or MDF using a "home made" track and a circular saw, and it just did produce good results. Also, for MDF in particular, that product is too heavy and unwieldy to lift to attempt to use a table saw. That's where these plunge saws come in handy.

seekins


quality posts: 1 Private Messages seekins

Here is the deal -> this is not to be compared to a Festool track saw. It is not as good - not nearly as good - but it is 1/5 the price. You need to compare this against a regular circular saw with a guide - it is way, way better than that.

My main complaint, as others have stated, is that this is just not enough track, and I see no source for track other than at Grizzly (they sell a rebranded version of this saw) where they have 102" track or $200.

RogerB


quality posts: 4 Private Messages RogerB
R&D wrote:Normally... one would have to frequent a Harbor Freight store to achieve this level of quality. Don't plan on this tool becoming a family heirloom...



That's pretty funny!

florabama


quality posts: 1 Private Messages florabama

I'm a little confused on how this thing works. How do you ensure that the cut is square? If you're cross cutting a 4X8 sheet, do you have to draw a line and then align the track or does it clamp down square?

seekins


quality posts: 1 Private Messages seekins
florabama wrote:I'm a little confused on how this thing works. How do you ensure that the cut is square? If you're cross cutting a 4X8 sheet, do you have to draw a line and then align the track or does it clamp down square?



This does not ensure the cut is square - it only helps make it straight. You measure to two spots, and line up the ends of the track to those measurements. You can/should clamp it at both ends. This model has some rubber pads on the bottom that supposedly keep it in place, but I wouldn't trust them.

florabama


quality posts: 1 Private Messages florabama
seekins wrote:This does not ensure the cut is square - it only helps make it straight. You measure to two spots, and line up the ends of the track to those measurements. You can/should clamp it at both ends. This model has some rubber pads on the bottom that supposedly keep it in place, but I wouldn't trust them.



Thanks Seekins. Do you know if the cut aligns with the edge of the track or is it off a fraction of an inch. In other words, if you draw a line and put the track on that line will that be where the cut is or is it some fraction of an inch to the right of that line? For instance, when I want to square up the end of a board, I'll often lay my triangle square on the board for a straight edge and run my skill saw against that edge but I must first align the blade with the cut then snug up my triangle square since I must account for the distance on the bottom plate of the saw between the straight edge and the blade. I'm wondering how you line up this saw so the blade precisely hits the line you want to cut.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 545 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

seekins wrote:Here is the deal -> this is not to be compared to a Festool track saw. It is not as good - not nearly as good - but it is 1/5 the price. You need to compare this against a regular circular saw with a guide - it is way, way better than that.

My main complaint, as others have stated, is that this is just not enough track, and I see no source for track other than at Grizzly (they sell a rebranded version of this saw) where they have 102" track or $200.


We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.



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orielbean


quality posts: 2 Private Messages orielbean

1. What is a plunge saw?
A: It is a circular saw that runs along a portable aluminum track.

2. Why would I bother with this instead of my table saw?
A: The tracks are portable and the assembly packs up pretty small for moving things around. A table saw is better as you can set the cut fence once for many repeat cuts of the same width, but the plunge saw is easier to cut large sheet goods if your table is not very big and you dont own outfeed tables.

3. Why would I bother with this instead of a circular / worm-drive saw?
A: The track guides the saw directly instead of being held sideways like most saw guides - this usually keeps the cut perfectly straight once you line up the fence with a square and clamp it to the work. Also many tracks have a special rubber edge where the saw blade runs right up against, which prevents tear-out on nice sheet goods.

4. What are the downsides beyond what I listed in #2 & #3 above?
A: Track length. Tracks can be super expensive if you intend to cut longer lengths. Set up for each cut does not let you repeat cuts quickly. You usually need to buy special saw blades versus common and cheap circular/table saw blades.

I don't work for the seller, but I do have the DeWalt version. FesTool makes the most expensive and usually best-reviewed of the breed, with the DeWalt coming in a close second in my opinion. I spent about 250 on the saw itself with one blade and a 4 foot track, then another 120 for an 8 foot track. Then another 30 for the special inline track clamps, and another 30 for a cool track attachment that fits my router (love it!). A little over 400.00 and I use it all the time.

All told, I could've bought a cheap table saw and circular saw, but I love my DeWalt. The cuts are very clean, the clamps are powerful, and the router attachment is a whole new world of use for the tracks. The plunge saw concept is very light and portable in my opinion.

My recommendation - unless you can get a longer track, this thing is a waste of money. Underpowered, replacement blades are not cheap if they only use FesTool blades, and I have no ideas on the track quality here which is the main attraction of a plunge saw. The link that you see lower in the discussion seems to be an unavailable Amazon product.

More importantly - it seems they do not make an 8 foot track, but rather two shorter lengths that you connect under the guide rail. I strongly dislike those connectors, as you can easily skew the track at the connection and then lose the straightness/squareness of the assembly.

For those of you that want to dip your toes in the plunge saw waters (that sounds dangerous), you really should start w/ a good table saw and circular saw I'm tryin' to think, but nuthin' happens.

When you encounter disappointing scenarios that those tools do not easily solve, go get the plunge saw - not really an entry-level woodworker "must have" tool here...

The Sawmill Creek discussion is really excellent comparison of the product versus the FesTool.

PS you may see deals for a battery-powered DeWalt saw - avoid those like the plague! :-)

Cargo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Cargo
ThunderThighs wrote:We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.



Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Hahahaha

seekins


quality posts: 1 Private Messages seekins
florabama wrote:Thanks Seekins. Do you know if the cut aligns with the edge of the track or ...



For this tool, the edge of the guide is the cut line. So to get the cut you want, you put the track on top of the piece you are keeping and line the edge of the guide to your marks, the saw kerf will be to the right of the track.

Iisaic


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Iisaic

I was curious about the rails, and found the short rails are the only ones available. Getting another rail and splines makes it long enough for crosscutting a 4x8 sheet, but someone said it balks at the spline joint. Also found another comment; " I would have given it a five but for the fact that you can not find rails online anywhere to extend the rails to cut an 80 inch door. I finally ordered a set of Makita rails which work great with the saw."
Hope this helps.

Iisaic

mikeaa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mikeaa
ThunderThighs wrote:We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.



The link goes to a product that is "is currently unavailable"

acanarelli


quality posts: 202 Private Messages acanarelli

I've been an avid woodworker most of my life and therefore have a good knowledge of woodworking tools. I've seen similar plunge saws on the market and in operation but I've never owned one. As I see it, this type of tool is almost a requirement when one must bring the saw to the work rather than the work to the saw. To illustrate, a table saw is used when the work can be brought to the saw, and this tool must be used when the saw must be taken to the work (such as shown in the video cutting already laid flooring). This saw may make other applications a lot easier than using the conventional table saw or the sliding compound miter saw, but for the average home owner, I don't see this tool as an absolute necessity or ready to displace the standby table saw.

rosweed


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rosweed

Good review here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbPLc0lGdFw

Magdelana


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Magdelana
ThunderThighs wrote:We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.



That link is not particularly handy, unlike this saw, as it says it's out of stock!

mrln


quality posts: 3 Private Messages mrln
seekins wrote:My main complaint, as others have stated, is that this is just not enough track, and I see no source for track other than at Grizzly (they sell a rebranded version of this saw) where they have 102" track or $200.



If the same or compatible, which it appears to be from what others have mentioned and a comment under an Amazon review also says, Grizzly sells the saw alone for $179.95, seems no rails or connectors included:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Track-Saw/T10687

I do not see the 102" rail you mentioned. The only rail is the 55" for $49.95:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Guide-Rail-for-T10687/T24872

A rail connector is included in an accessory pack for $24.95:

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Accessory-Pack-for-T10687/T25094

And all 3 are included in a package for $245.00 (roughly comparable to what woot is selling here but without the clamps):

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Track-Saw-Master-Pack/T25552

Their catalog and flyer links which can give folks maybe a better idea of the breakdown:

http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2013/Main/248

http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2013/SpringFlyer/40

(btw, I don't hyperlink on purpose.)

HTH

seekins


quality posts: 1 Private Messages seekins
mrln wrote:
I do not see the 102" rail you mentioned. The only rail is the 55" for $49.95:



My mistake... I see that the 102" track is actually a Dewalt track... they tricked me by listing it in the "Accessories and Related Items:" preview.

mynamehere


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mynamehere

From what I've read, Grizzly is the US distributor, but it's rebadged as the T25552 Track Saw, so parts should be interchangeable.

Looks like the accessory pack is a good idea, as it includes a clip that keeps the saw from rocking/tipping on the track (should be included IMO). Think I'll grab one of those, and a 55" track from Grizzly to add to the included track for cutting 8' sheets.

Sheppach is a German company, but who knows if that meant anything in terms of quality.

Loeb


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Loeb

Be aware that the Amazon page for the Scheppach M90700 (same saw) at http://www.amazon.com/Scheppach-M90700-4-inch-Plunge-Connector/dp/B009AQ81FQ warns that this is a CHOKING HAZARD! Parents, don't let your younger children use this saw. Woot should be more responsible and include this warning.

florabama


quality posts: 1 Private Messages florabama
seekins wrote:For this tool, the edge of the guide is the cut line. So to get the cut you want, you put the track on top of the piece you are keeping and line the edge of the guide to your marks, the saw kerf will be to the right of the track.



Thanks.

Joshua714


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Joshua714
ThunderThighs wrote:We linked to extra track in the Features available through Scheppach via Amazon.



Thanks for the link, item is listed but not available for purchase, also doesn't list track length.

David

sparkynj


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sparkynj
orielbean wrote:1. What is a plunge saw?
A: It is a circular saw that runs along a portable aluminum track.

2. Why would I bother with this instead of my table saw?
A: The tracks are portable and the assembly packs up pretty small for moving things around. A table saw is better as you can set the cut fence once for many repeat cuts of the same width, but the plunge saw is easier to cut large sheet goods if your table is not very big and you dont own outfeed tables.

3. Why would I bother with this instead of a circular / worm-drive saw?
A: The track guides the saw directly instead of being held sideways like most saw guides - this usually keeps the cut perfectly straight once you line up the fence with a square and clamp it to the work. Also many tracks have a special rubber edge where the saw blade runs right up against, which prevents tear-out on nice sheet goods.

4. What are the downsides beyond what I listed in #2 & #3 above?
A: Track length. Tracks can be super expensive if you intend to cut longer lengths. Set up for each cut does not let you repeat cuts quickly. You usually need to buy special saw blades versus common and cheap circular/table saw blades.

I don't work for the seller, but I do have the DeWalt version. FesTool makes the most expensive and usually best-reviewed of the breed, with the DeWalt coming in a close second in my opinion. I spent about 250 on the saw itself with one blade and a 4 foot track, then another 120 for an 8 foot track. Then another 30 for the special inline track clamps, and another 30 for a cool track attachment that fits my router (love it!). A little over 400.00 and I use it all the time.

All told, I could've bought a cheap table saw and circular saw, but I love my DeWalt. The cuts are very clean, the clamps are powerful, and the router attachment is a whole new world of use for the tracks. The plunge saw concept is very light and portable in my opinion.

My recommendation - unless you can get a longer track, this thing is a waste of money. Underpowered, replacement blades are not cheap if they only use FesTool blades, and I have no ideas on the track quality here which is the main attraction of a plunge saw. The link that you see lower in the discussion seems to be an unavailable Amazon product.

More importantly - it seems they do not make an 8 foot track, but rather two shorter lengths that you connect under the guide rail. I strongly dislike those connectors, as you can easily skew the track at the connection and then lose the straightness/squareness of the assembly.

For those of you that want to dip your toes in the plunge saw waters (that sounds dangerous), you really should start w/ a good table saw and circular saw I'm tryin' to think, but nuthin' happens.

When you encounter disappointing scenarios that those tools do not easily solve, go get the plunge saw - not really an entry-level woodworker "must have" tool here...

The Sawmill Creek discussion is really excellent comparison of the product versus the FesTool.

PS you may see deals for a battery-powered DeWalt saw - avoid those like the plague! :-)



orielbean, I'd be really interested in seeing the actual details of your Dewalt tracksaw setup, Saw and Track models, etc. I'm just starting out looking to put together a set that will last me quite some time.

colovos


quality posts: 1 Private Messages colovos
Joshua714 wrote:Thanks for the link, item is listed but not available for purchase, also doesn't list track length.



Sorry for not introducing myself earlier. My name is George, and I work for Scheppach. If you have any other questions about the product today, please let me know and I’ll try to answer them for you.

RE: Track length: 25" with one connector. Amazon has been updated and more tracks are available.

steve7359


quality posts: 0 Private Messages steve7359
colovos wrote:Sorry for not introducing myself earlier. My name is George, and I work for Scheppach. If you have any other questions about the product today, please let me know and I’ll try to answer them for you.

RE: Track length: 25" with one connector. Amazon has been updated and more tracks are available.



George,
Is there a place (in the US) that has the other accessories for sale, like the stops or the hold-downs?
Thanks
Steve

CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 23 Private Messages CuzzinMerl
peakandpine wrote:Ah, what t'hell is a plunge saw?



You use it to cut a moon roof in your car.

erorc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages erorc
Jackson20 wrote:Is this like a skill saw with training wheels?


Basically, yes. Clamp the track to your sheet of plywood, lined up with your cut line and cut a nice straight edge. MUCH easier (and safer) than trying to run a 4x8 sheet of plywood thru a tablsesaw, and easier and more accurate than pretty much every other method of cutting a straight line with a circular saw.

erorc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages erorc
CuzzinMerl wrote:You use it to cut a moon roof in your car.


A plunge cut starts "in the middle" of your workpiece, as opposed to the edge (as in a rip cut).